Sustainable Development : Data and Facts

These are interesting stuff I learned. Data is ever available, you can browse and understand how the world has changed for the past hundred years

1) Wealth & Health of Nations at Gapminder (http://www.gapminder.org/world)

a) There are graph shows how long people live / mortality rate and how much money they earn. Click the play button to see how countries have developed since 1800.

Life Expectancy for Sweden and Mozambique   from 1800-2012
Life Expectancy for Sweden and Mozambique from 1800-2012

b) Can check the CO2 emission since 1820. In 1820, at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, United Kingdom emitted most CO2 – both per person and in total emissions.  Click Play to see how USA becomes the largest emitter of CO2 from 1900 onwards.

2) World Bank Development Indicators data (http://data.worldbank.org/indicator)

From mortality rate, economic growth rate,  foreign investment, electricity consumption, freshwater withdrawal, to CO2 emission.

CO2 Emission ( metric ton per capita), comparison between low, middle, high income countries against the world average
CO2 Emission ( metric ton per capita), comparison between low, middle, high income countries against the world average

3) Compare 2 countries data (http://www.nationmaster.com/index.php) from education, energy, democracy to crime rates.

4) CIA website (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/) that include world wide data. Can compare and download the data.

5) Building energy data in US (http://buildingsdatabook.eren.doe.gov)

6) The Keeling Curve  is a measurement of the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere made atop Hawaii’s Mauna Loa since 1958. It is the longest-running such measurement in the world. It recorded concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide in the global atmosphere are surpassing 400 parts per million (ppm) on weekly average for the first time in human history in  May 2013 ( http://keelingcurve.ucsd.edu/)

Mauna_Loa_CO2

7) The Great Gatsby Curve ( http://www.bloomberg.com/infographics/2013-10-08/the-great-gatsby-curve-explained.html) illustrates the connection between concentration of wealth in one generation and the ability of those in the next generation to move up the economic ladder compared to their parents. The curve shows that children from poor families are less likely to improve their economic status as adults in countries where income inequality was higher – meaning wealth was concentrated in fewer hands – around the time those children were growing up.

BW51_econ_inequalitychart_630

 

3 thoughts on “Sustainable Development : Data and Facts

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s